Central Victoria prepares for another bad summer of fruit flies | Bendigo advertiser



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HARCOURT Valley fruit growers prepare for a second high-risk fruit fly season as Agriculture Victoria urges people across central Victoria to protect fruit and vegetables in backyards. Fruit flies benefit from warm and wet conditions across the state, and the Bureau of Meteorology believes a La Nina summer weather pattern will form in the coming months. It will likely bring wetter weather conditions which Queensland fruit flies will thrive in, said Cathy Mansfield, Victoria Agriculture coordinator. “The Victorians have spent a lot of time at home this year and a lot of people have rekindled their passion for gardening,” she said. “It is important that they understand the signs of the Queensland fruit fly and avoid the disappointment of cutting into their proudly home-grown produce and finding fruit fly maggots.” Related news: Rising regional COVID-19 cases “expected” Home gardeners are also among the first lines of defense for the fruit industry in general. Your care can prevent the pest from spreading to commercial orchards, said Terry Willis, a member of the Harcourt Valley Fruit Fly Action Group. “A fruit tree is not just an owner’s asset. It’s also a collective task, ”he said. “If people think that way, we’re going to stay in a great place.” Last year, fruit flies were found breeding near Harcourt on five separate occasions. These included confirmed cases in Harcourt, Harcourt North and Castlemaine and sparked renewed discussions about additional protective measures and non-profit videos with “Ernie the Fruit Fly”. Rapid action and community support prevented isolated fruit flies from spreading further, Willis said. People in Harcourt Valley and wider Mount Alexander Shire have accepted messages that would minimize fruit fly outbreaks, he said. “We are very preventative and have a lot of support and awareness in the community,” said Willis. Ms. Mansfield said that fruit tree netting is the best way to protect trees. People should catch them when they’re done blooming, she said. Queensland fruit flies attack a range of fruits and vegetables, including tomatoes, stone fruits, citrus fruits, cherries, berries, and grapes. They leave a “lead stain” on the fruit when the eggs are laid. The markings are often the size of the tip of a pin and can easily be overlooked if not carefully searched for. As soon as the fruits are pricked, they start to rot inside. Fruit fly maggots are often found in the center of the fruit, are 5 to 10 mm long and creamy white, ”said Ms. Mansfield. Landowners can use the following techniques to protect produce in their gardens: Visit Agriculture Victoria website for more tips. Our journalists work hard to provide the community with local, breaking news. Here’s how you can access our trusted content:

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HARCOURT Valley fruit growers prepare for a second high-risk fruit fly season as Agriculture Victoria urges people across central Victoria to protect fruit and vegetables in backyards.

Fruit flies benefit from warm and wet conditions across the state, and the Bureau of Meteorology believes a La Nina summer weather pattern will form in the coming months.

It will likely bring wetter weather conditions which Queensland fruit flies will thrive in, said Cathy Mansfield, Victoria Agriculture coordinator.

“The Victorians have spent a lot of time at home this year and a lot of people have rekindled their passion for gardening,” she said.

“It is important that they understand the signs of the Queensland fruit fly and avoid the disappointment of cutting into their proudly home-grown produce and finding fruit fly maggots.”

Home gardeners are also among the first lines of defense for the wider fruit industry.

Your care can prevent the pest from spreading to commercial orchards, said Terry Willis, a member of the Harcourt Valley Fruit Fly Action Group.

“A fruit tree is not just an owner’s asset. It’s also a collective task, ”he said.

“If people think that way, we’re going to stay in a great place.”

Ernie the Fruit Fly has appeared in nonprofit videos commissioned by the City of Greater Bendigo and Mount Alexander Shire.  Image: DELIVERED

Ernie the Fruit Fly has appeared in nonprofit videos commissioned by the City of Greater Bendigo and Mount Alexander Shire. Image: DELIVERED

Last year, fruit flies were found breeding near Harcourt on five separate occasions.

Rapid action and community support prevented isolated fruit flies from spreading further, Willis said.

People in Harcourt Valley and wider Mount Alexander Shire have accepted messages that would minimize fruit fly outbreaks, he said.

“We are very preventative and have a lot of support and awareness in the community,” said Willis.

Ms. Mansfield said that fruit tree netting is the best way to protect trees.

People should catch them when they’re done blooming, she said.

Queensland fruit flies attack a range of fruits and vegetables, including tomatoes, stone fruits, citrus fruits, cherries, berries, and grapes.

They leave a “lead stain” on the fruit when the eggs are laid. The markings are often the size of the tip of a pin and can easily be overlooked if not carefully searched for.

As soon as the fruits are pricked, they start to rot inside.

Fruit fly maggots are often found in the center of the fruit, are 5 to 10 mm long and creamy white, ”said Ms. Mansfield.

Landowners can use the following techniques to protect products in their gardens:

  • Follow good gardening hygiene such as picking fruits and vegetables as they ripen
  • carefully dispose of unwanted fruit and leftovers
  • Regularly check for the presence of fruit flies in home gardens
  • Protect trees, plants and products with nets, pavilions and bags
  • Use baits, traps, and insecticide control.

Our journalists work hard to bring local, breaking news to the community. Here’s how you can access our trusted content:

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