Matador Pest Control discovers giant termite tube – PCT


Editor’s Note: August PCT includes the Rethinking Rodent Management feature, which examines how pest control companies in the Golden State and elsewhere are rethinking their rodent control programs following the passage of AB 1788, a law restricting the use of SGARs in California. has pest control companies in the Golden State and elsewhere rethink their rodent control programs. PCT reached out to the rodenticide manufacturers in the industry to learn more about how they are responding to California AB 1788. Here’s what they had to say.

BASF

PCT: Are you addressing AB 1788? In which way?

Jeremy Davis, ACE, Senior Sales Specialist, BASF Professional & Specialty Solutions: The California Ecosystems Protection Act (AB 1788) has led pest control companies and pest control professionals (PMPs) to rethink and often rebuild their rodent control programs. Our responsibility as a rodenticide manufacturer is to work closely with local distributors and state associations to promote good administration, education, and training for all PMPs in California.

PCT: Do your customers ask for advice on legally compliant rodent control? What are you telling them

JD: Since the reintroduction of AB 1788 in 2019, many companies have reached out to us for guidance and alternative ways to provide rodent control services. The two most common questions we receive relate to rodenticide options and understanding the law itself.

In 2020, California had over 60 registered second generation anticoagulant rodenticides (SGARs) in the state. With these products now banned (with a few exceptions), pest experts are looking at a much smaller selection of baits available. We are busy educating PMPs on how non-SGAR products can meet their customers’ needs. As far as the explanation of the new law is concerned, it is best to address such questions to the responsible agricultural commissioner of the district.

PCT: Do you have rodent baiting best practices that you want to share?

JD: The safety of children, pets, and wildlife is paramount and should always be considered when conducting rodent control services. The days of sole bait work are over and we need to focus more on integrated pest management (IPM). Inspection and effective customer communication are more important than ever.

Regarding best practices, we may recommend sanitation, reduction of housing and exclusion first, and if non-targets are a local issue, I recommend implementing non-toxic alternatives like traps, monitors, or surveillance bait. Rodenticide bait is part of an IPM approach; Familiarize yourself with the label as it may be different from your previous rodenticide, follow all directions for use, install tamper-evident bait stations, and make sure they are properly labeled and secured.

PCT: Do you have any comments on AB 1788?

JD: We must keep in mind that AB 1788 is a moratorium and prohibits the use of SGARs with a few exceptions until the California Department of Pesticide Regulation has completed the re-evaluation of these products. Once the reassessment process is complete, California could change current conditions or place additional restrictions to limit the impact of these rodenticides on wildlife. It is our responsibility to comply with all state and federal laws and government requirements and to be good administrators for our industry.

PCT: Do you now see above-average rodent pressure on the west coast? In which way?

JD: In recent years we have seen a sharp increase in rodent activity. Much of the increased rodent pressures can be attributed to the pandemic. For example, restaurant closings force rodents to find new sources of food, and more residents staying at home make the resident more likely to see additional pest pressure. Given the current environment and the impact of the pandemic, I’d estimate the rodent market in California is growing faster than any other segment this year.

PCT: Is there anything else PCT readers shouldn’t know about this topic?

JD: As environments change and our industry becomes more focused on IPM, our time spent on inspections couldn’t be more important. Thorough inspection, identification, and implementation will lay the foundation for a successful rodent management program. Whether exclusion, bait or newer innovations such as remote monitoring, we must never ignore changes and be open to the future of rodent control.

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Bell laboratories

PCT: Are you talking about AB 1877? In which way?

Patrick Lynch, Senior Vice President of Sales, Bell Laboratories: Bell’s mission is to provide as many tools as possible to pest controllers to help tackle the disease and destruction caused by rodents. By the time AB 1788 went into law in late 2020, Bell had been working to achieve registration of two new all-California rodenticides. This spring, Bell Contrac California introduced Bromethalin Blox to its California customers to ensure that PMPs in California had access to a variety of options regardless of regulatory challenges. Bell has also just launched the Contrac California Bromethalin Soft Bait on the California market.

PCT: Do you have rodent baiting best practices that you want to share?

PL: Bell’s technical sales team is fully equipped to provide PMPs with bespoke bait practices in even the most difficult rodent situations. Please contact your local Bell Technical Sales Representative for further assistance and resources.

PCT: Is there anything else PCT readers shouldn’t know about this topic?

PL: Bell is proud to have introduced the only affordable rodent monitoring bait station with its iQ line of products. Due to the changing regulatory landscape, the need for PMPs to know when and where rodents are traveling has increased.

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Lipatech

PCT: Are you talking about AB 1877? In which way?

John Murphy, Technical Support Manager, Lipatech: We’re turning to AB 1788. One way is to work with the Best Management Practices study that DPR funded to help re-evaluate SGARs. We have a full line of bait products for the California market. Our newest product, Flatline, is a new chlorophacinone softbait.

PCT: Do your customers ask for advice on legally compliant rodent control? What are you telling them

JM: We review our product selections with them and always offer on-site support to help.

PCT: Do you have rodent baiting best practices that you want to share?

JM: We have repackaged our non-toxic bait attractants and, as always, we are constantly discussing and reviewing the correct rodent control practices. Rodenticides are an important tool for successful rodent control, but only one tool. PMPs need to be open-minded and communicate with their customers that strategies can change and the frequency of service visits could increase.

PCT: Do you have any comments on AB 1877?

JM: We will continue to work with and support the Best Management Practices Study to aid in the re-evaluation of SGARS.

PCT: Do you now see above-average rodent pressure on the west coast?

JM: Rodent populations continue to increase, but there are many factors that contribute to their growth.

PCT: In which way?

JM: The lack of aggressive rodent control programs, poor sanitation and structural deficiencies are just a few factors that play a role in creating conducive conditions.

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