Protect your home from insects in a La Nina winter


West Palm Beach, Florida – Weather forecasters say we can see a La Nina winter this year, which means warmer days. You may like this heat, but it turns out some insects do too. WPBF 25 News is researching how to protect your home from possible insect invasion this winter. For Julie Ball, a warmer winter means more time to enjoy her garden. But for some beetles, it’s party time too. “I love all the native insects as long as they’re not in my garden,” says Ball with a laugh. Ball wasted no time and hired native pest management to get the insects under control before winter. “Put some bait here,” said Sean McKearn, technical advisor, as he showed Ball how to deal with problem areas in your house We didn’t have such things at all in the first few years we lived here, “said Ball. Last July was the hottest in the world since it started taking temperatures 142 years ago, according to NOAA. Could La Nina mean that we are also facing a record-breaking warm winter? Ball says she is concerned about global warming. Brandon Burke, who has been in the pest control business for a decade, says he is busier than ever during the winter months The higher the temperature, the greater the activity, “said Dr. William Kern, Associate Professor of Entomology and Nemotology at the University of Florida at Ft. Lauderdale Research and Education Center. Kern says it’s too early to say if warming climates will affect insects, but admits that weather patterns do have an impact. “The pest activity will change with the weather conditions, a rainy season, the pest activity will increase.” Dr. Kern says that every insect reacts in a unique way. Take a warm, dry winter. In this weather some termites will need a good rainstorm first before swarming, but ants and cockroaches will be more outside. “It’s sure to be a problem for homeowners,” said Ball. Ball has got her termite problem under control and now has an inkling of what a La Nina winter could bring to her home. “When it gets warmer, we should all be on the lookout for unique and different new insects.” Kern has a little DIY tip for you. He says check the weather strips around your doors because that’s one of the best ways to keep the bugs out.

West Palm Beach, Florida – Weather forecasters say we can see a La Nina winter this year, which means warmer days. You may like this heat, but it turns out some insects do too. WPBF 25 News is researching how to protect your home from possible insect invasion this winter.

For Julie Ball, a warmer winter means more time to enjoy her garden. But for some bugs, it’s party time too.

“I love all native insects as long as they are not in my garden,” says Ball with a laugh.

Ball wasted no time and hired native pest management to get the insects under control before winter.

“Put some bait here,” said Sean McKearn, technical advisor, as he shows Ball how to deal with problem areas in her home.

“We notice more in the evening that we have to put on the mosquito bracelet and things like that … In the first years we lived here, we didn’t have things like that at all,” said Ball.

Last July was the hottest in the world since it started taking temperatures 142 years ago, according to NOAA. Could La Nina mean that we are also facing a record-breaking warm winter?

Ball says she is concerned the climate is getting warmer.

Brandon Burke, who has been in pest control for a decade, says he is busier than ever during the winter months.

One study predicts the pest control industry will grow an average of 4.5% each year through 2027.

“I think we just had a spike in mosquito appointments today, which is unusual this time of year,” said Burke, executive director of native pest management.

“Usually, the higher the temperature, the greater the activity,” said Dr. William Kern, Associate Professor of Entomology and Nemotology at the University of Florida at Ft. Lauderdale Research and Education Center.

Kern says it’s too early to say whether a warming climate will affect insects, but admits that weather patterns do have an impact.

“Pest activity changes with weather conditions. So if we have a warm or rainy season, this will increase the pest activity. “

Dr. Kern says that every insect reacts in a unique way.

Take a warm, dry winter. In this weather some termites will need a good rainstorm first before swarming, but ants and cockroaches will be more outside.

“As a homeowner, that’s certainly a concern,” said Ball.

Ball got her termite problem under control and is now expecting what a La Nina winter could bring home for her.

“When it gets warmer, we should all be on the lookout for unique and different new insects.”

Kern has a little DIY tip for you. He says check the weather strips around your doors because that’s one of the best ways to keep the bugs out.

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